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Returning Veterans

The Rand Corporation says that Since October 2001, approximately 1.64 million U.S. troops have deployed to support operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Many have been exposed for prolonged periods to combat-related stress or traumatic events. Safeguarding the mental health of these service members and veterans is an important part of ensuring the future readiness of our military force and compensating and honoring those who have served our nation. In the wake of recent reports and media attention, public concern about the care of the war wounded is high. In response, several task forces, independent review groups, and a Presidential Commission have examined the care of the war wounded and recommended improvements. Policy changes and funding shifts are already under way.

 

However, the impetus for policy change has outpaced the knowledge needed to inform solutions. Fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the mental health and cognitive needs of U.S. service members returning from Afghanistan and Iraq, the costs of mental health and cognitive conditions, and the care systems available to deliver treatment.

 http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_briefs/RB9336/index1.html 

 Veterans Crisis Line | Hotline, Online Chat, & Text

 The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

 Recognize the Signs and call the Hotline 1-800-273-8255

Many Veterans may not show any signs of intent to harm themselves before doing so, but some actions can be a sign that a Veteran needs help. Veterans in crisis may show behaviors that indicate a risk of harming themselves.

 Veterans who are considering suicide often show signs of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and/or hopelessness, such as:

• Appearing sad or depressed most of the time

• Clinical depression: deep sadness, loss of interest, trouble sleeping and eating—that doesn’t go away or continues to get worse

• Feeling anxious, agitated, or unable to sleep

• Neglecting personal welfare, deteriorating physical appearance

• Withdrawing from friends, family, and society, or sleeping all the time

• Losing interest in hobbies, work, school, or other things one used to care about

• Frequent and dramatic mood changes

• Expressing feelings of excessive guilt or shame

• Feelings of failure or decreased performance

• Feeling that life is not worth living, having no sense of purpose in life

• Talk about feeling trapped—like there is no way out of a situation

• Having feelings of desperation, and saying that there’s no solution to their problems

Their behavior may be dramatically different from their normal behavior, or they may appear to be actively contemplating or preparing for a suicidal act through behaviors such as:

• Performing poorly at work or school

• Acting recklessly or engaging in risky activities—seemingly without thinking

• Showing violent behavior such as punching holes in walls, getting into fights or self-destructive violence; feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge

• Looking as though one has a “death wish,” tempting fate by taking risks that could lead to death, such as driving fast or running red lights

• Giving away prized possessions

• Putting affairs in order, tying up loose ends, and/or making out a will

• Seeking access to firearms, pills, or other means of harming oneself

 Veterans and their loved ones can call the Hotline 1-800-273-8255

The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

 Veterans Crisis Line | Hotline, Online Chat & Text

The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

 Recognize the Signs and call the Hotline 1-800-273-8255

Many Veterans may not show any signs of intent to harm themselves before doing so, but some actions can be a sign that a Veteran needs help. Veterans in crisis may show behaviors that indicate a risk of harming themselves.

 Veterans who are considering suicide often show signs of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and/or hopelessness, such as:

• Appearing sad or depressed most of the time

• Clinical depression: deep sadness, loss of interest, trouble sleeping and eating—that doesn’t go away or continues to get worse

• Feeling anxious, agitated, or unable to sleep

• Neglecting personal welfare, deteriorating physical appearance

• Withdrawing from friends, family, and society, or sleeping all the time

• Losing interest in hobbies, work, school, or other things one used to care about

• Frequent and dramatic mood changes

• Expressing feelings of excessive guilt or shame

• Feelings of failure or decreased performance

• Feeling that life is not worth living, having no sense of purpose in life

• Talk about feeling trapped—like there is no way out of a situation

• Having feelings of desperation, and saying that there’s no solution to their problems

 Their behavior may be dramatically different from their normal behavior, or they may appear to be actively contemplating or preparing for a suicidal act through behaviors such as:

• Performing poorly at work or school

• Acting recklessly or engaging in risky activities—seemingly without thinking

• Showing violent behavior such as punching holes in walls, getting into fights or self-destructive violence; feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge

• Looking as though one has a “death wish,” tempting fate by taking risks that could lead to death, such as driving fast or running red lights

• Giving away prized possessions

• Putting affairs in order, tying up loose ends, and/or making out a will

• Seeking access to firearms, pills, or other means of harming oneself

 Veterans and their loved ones can call the Hotline 1-800-273-8255

The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

 The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

 Recognize the Signs and call the Hotline 1-800-273-8255

 Many Veterans may not show any signs of intent to harm themselves before doing so, but some actions can be a sign that a Veteran is considering suicide. the Vet would often show signs of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and/or hopelessness, such as:

     • Appearing sad or depressed most of the time

     • Clinical depression: deep sadness, loss of interest, trouble sleeping and eating—that doesn’t go away or continues to get worse

     • Feeling anxious, agitated, or unable to sleep

     • Neglecting personal welfare, deteriorating physical appearance

     • Withdrawing from friends, family, and society, or sleeping all the time

     • Losing interest in hobbies, work, school, or other things one used to care about

     • Frequent and dramatic mood changes

     • Expressing feelings of excessive guilt or shame

     • Feelings of failure or decreased performance

     • Feeling that life is not worth living, having no sense of purpose in life

     • Talk about feeling trapped—like there is no way out of a situation

     • Having feelings of desperation, and saying that there’s no solution to their problems

Their behavior may be dramatically different from their normal behavior, or they may appear to be actively contemplating or preparing for a suicidal act through behaviors such as:

     • Performing poorly at work or school

     • Acting recklessly or engaging in risky activities—seemingly without thinking

     • Showing violent behavior such as punching holes in walls, getting into fights or self-destructive violence; feeling rage or uncontrolled anger or seeking revenge

     • Looking as though one has a “death wish,” tempting fate by taking risks that could lead to death, such as driving fast or running red lights

     • Giving away prized possessions

     • Putting affairs in order, tying up loose ends, and/or making out a will

     • Seeking access to firearms, pills, or other means of harming oneself

 Veterans and their loved ones can call the Hotline 1-800-273-8255

 The Veterans Crisis Line connects Veterans in crisis and their families and friends with qualified, caring Department of Veterans Affairs responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text. Veterans and their loved ones can call 1-800-273-8255 and Press 1, chat online, or send a text message to 838255 to receive confidential support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year. Support for deaf and hard of hearing individuals is available.

The National Guard Association of California
3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 230
Sacramento, CA 95827

NGAC Telephone: 916.362.3411
NGAC FAX: 916.362.3707
AFBA/SSLI Administrator Telephone: 800.462.7441 or 540.248.0837
AFBA/SSLI FAX: 540.248.0837

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